Search by keyword

Research Seminar: Robbing Peter to pay Paul: A moral self-regulation perspective on why and when pro family-unethical behavior motivate incivility at home and helping behavior at work.

Research Seminar: Robbing Peter to pay Paul: A moral self-regulation perspective on why and when pro family-unethical behavior motivate incivility at home and helping behavior at work.

Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Business invites you to the Research Seminar titled “Robbing Peter to pay Paul: A moral self-regulation perspective on why and when pro family-unethical behavior motivate incivility at home and helping behavior at work”, presented by Dr. Mayowa Babalola

Abstract

Keywords: work-family, unethical behavior, moral self-regulation, family incivility, citizenship“For the sake of the family”, recent research suggests that people can go the extra mile to engage in behaviors that benefit their families even though it violates societal and organizational norms, a phenomenon referred to as unethical pro-family behavior (UPFB). Despite its prevalence among working adults, the management field is limited in its understanding of how actors react following their UPFB and the implications for work and family outcomes. In this seminar, I will discuss a research where we investigated this issue. Specifically, we advance the work-family literature by drawing on moral self-regulation theory to propose that UPFB elicits ambivalent cognitions that has downstream consequences for actor’s subsequent behaviors at home and at work. Because of its beneficial nature to the family, we propose that UPFB elicits the perception of family-based moral credits that propels actor’s family-directed incivility. Yet, given its violation of moral norms, UPFB elicits the perception of organization-based moral deficits that propels actor’s organization-directed citizenship. Furthermore, we propose that actors’ moral identity weakens the extent to which family-based moral credits are perceived following UPFB and strengthens the extent to which organization-based moral deficits are perceived following UPFB. These ideas were tested in a field study involving working adults in a wide range of industries. Implications of the research for theory and practice will be discussed.

Time: 6 pm - 7 pm
Area: Human Resources Management

REGISTRATION HERE


Add to your calendar

Date:

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Time:

06:00

Location:

ZOOM

Speaker

Dr. Mayowa Babalola

Associate Professor at NUGSB

Dr. Mayowa Babalola is an Associate Professor at Nazarbayev University Graduate School of Business. He received his PhD in Psychology from the University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Belgium. Since then, he has held faculty positions in the areas of Organizational Behavior & Human Resource Management at the Australian Catholic University (Melbourne), NEOMA Business School in France, and United Arab Emirates University in the Middle East.

Mayowa’s research focuses primarily on leadership, behavioral ethics, and organizational health. Specifically, his research program revolves around understanding how to make organizations behave more ethically and build a more productive, healthier, and committed workforce. His work has appeared in top business and management journals including Journal of Management (Ranked ABS 4*, FT50), Personnel Psychology (ABS 4), Human Relations (ABS 4, FT50), and Journal of Business Ethics (ABS 3, FT50), and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Management and Journal of Business Ethics. In 2019, his work on how to prevent abusive supervision in the workplace received the Best Paper with Outstanding Practical Implications for Management Award at the Academy of Management conference, held in Boston, USA.

Having lived and worked in different continents including Africa, Australia, Europe, and the Middle East and conducted research in these contexts and other contexts including Asia and North America, he is readily available to share his experience and expertise with organizations and help them transform from Good to Outstanding.